The Case: Evaluation

When recollecting our first production Big Mikey (here), we have definitely come a long way in our film production since we have all learnt how to work better and convey our own opinions in a group without ending up in an argument. I have also learnt, with the help of my Music Tech AS to convey my points clearly, as in Music Tech we have to talk to someone in a separate room through a headset who cannot see the other, so my spoken communication has become greatly clearer. My scriptwriting and idea producing have also improved due to now being able to come up a realistic cop drama setting with a realistic 80’s style script. I feel that Viv’s directing has improved greatly as she is clearer in her directions which were much easier to follow than in Big Mikey. My editing has improved a fair deal, but due to the first two projects both being edited by Viv at home on ‘Windows Movie Maker’, so the rest of us didn’t have any input into the editing process. But with this project we did edit it in school on ‘Final Cut Pro’ on the iMacs, which is much more advanced than ‘Windows Movie Maker’, giving the rest of the group an input into the editing. The reason that ‘Movie Maker’ was used in the first place was because the files we recorded wouldn’t work on ‘Final Cut’, however after sorting these issues, we got around to using ‘Final Cut’.

This is Live Type, the software used for adding titles and credits

This is Live Type, the software used for adding titles and credits

This is 'Final Cut Pro'  the software we used to edit our project in

This is ‘Final Cut Pro’ the software we used to edit our project in

This software was able to work in collaboration with another piece of software called ‘Live Type’ which enables us to add titles and credits to our film opening. In ‘Final Cut’ we separated out our video and audio files, so that we could create sound bridges and voice overs, to make a more authentic looking film.

In terms of equipment we used a Nikon D3200 DSLR camera to film both our short film and film opening. We found out after watching our short film that the sound was a major issue because we only used the standard mic on the camera, however we did look into buying a separate mic for the camera, due to the college only having one shotgun mic, we didn’t as we couldn’t find an affordable one. We did around the major issue excessive background noise by recording in secluded spots, or if we were filming outside, we would cut the audio and play other audio over the top. Another sizable difference is the editing capabilities of ‘Final Cut’ in relation to that ‘Movie Maker’, due to having ‘Live Type’ that works in collaboration to it.

D3200 Shotgun mic

We tried thinking of what would attract the target audience we wanted and we thought of typical bad humour and a ‘bromance’ of the main characters (which tends to be a very common feature of Action/Comedy films). Due to film being aimed at young adults we made sure to add fairly cheesy and generic toilet humour, which comes up in many films aimed at a younger demographic.

When researching film distributors we found it clear to see that 20th Century Fox were the most likely film company to distribute an Action/Comedy film featuring a bromance.
20th Century Fox
Due to this, we decided that they would be the most likely to release a film like ours.

When writing and filming our film opening we thought it would be best to show a clear hierarchy between the characters, such as the Superintendent being higher in power than the two Detective Inspectors by giving the Superintendent room to move around freely in her office with many different camera angles, whereas with the Detective Inspectors, we gave them one single high-angle camera shot, with a couple of close-ups, looking down on them as though they have less power. When looking into these roles we decided the Superintendent would be a boring and stern individual who is also intelligent and forward-thinking, but weaker in the physical field. Due to this we gave her a black turtleneck sweater (similar to the one of Steve Jobs, and generally associated with Nerds) and a long, high-waisted, skirt (an item not worn when doing something physical due to the chance of losing ones modesty) and heels, an item difficult to run in whilst wearing. The last two mostly to express the fact that she is less suited to work in the field.
Viv
For the Detective Inspectors we chose items that portray them as being less intelligent than the Superintendent, who are better suited to work in the field, rather than the more theoretical side. We also went for one of the characters being less intelligent than the other, stealing the other ones ideas, claiming them as his own also displaying a sexist attitude. The second Detective Inspector would be a slightly more intelligent one than the other, but still less intelligent than the Superintendent. The Detective Inspectors wore leather jackets (something very common in any films or TV shows relating to cops), with a combination of white shirts and jeans (something, again, very common in films and TV shows relating to cops. These are also a smart/casual combination of clothing), sunglasses and converse trainers (because they became a very popular formal looking piece of footwear in the 80’s, which are also practical for physical activities). Most of these items reflect a relaxed attitude towards their job
.Picture I'm gonna use
Our films exhibits many of the normalities of an Action/Comedy, due to us focusing on making that a priority while producing our film opening. We greatly researched cop related films and TV shows and based our film on some of them aspects. A good example is the use of a ‘bromance’ between the two main male characters, like what is seen in ’21 Jump Street’, something commonly associated with Action/Comedy films. We also developed the idea of a female Superintendent due to the fact that most authoritative figures being male, this gave us an opening for the ‘weak female’ role, used in our film for an abduction victim.

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